Fredericks_Suzanne.pdf (274.04 kB)
Download file

An Examination of the difference in Performance of Self-Care Behaviours between White and Non-White Patients Following CABG Surgery: A Secondary Analysis

Download (274.04 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 21.05.2021, 15:35 by Suzanne Fredericks, Joyce Lo, Sarah Ibrahim, Jennifer Leung
BACKGROUND: The demographic profile of the patient receiving coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in Canada has changed significantly over the past 20 years from mainly white (i.e., English, Irish, Scottish) to non-white (i.e., Indian or Chinese). To support individuals who have recently undergone a CABG procedure, patient education is provided to guide performance of self-care behaviours in the home environment. The relevance of this education, when applied to the current CABG surgery population, is questionable, as it was designed and tested using a white, homogenous sample. Thus, the number and type of self-care behaviours performed by persons of Indian and Chinese origin has not been investigated. These individuals may have varying self-care needs that are not reflected in the current self-care patient education materials.
PURPOSE: The intent of this study was to examine the difference in the type and number of self-care behaviours performed between white and non-white patients following CABG surgery.
METHODS: This study is a sub-study of a descriptive, exploratory design that included a convenience sample. Ninety-nine patients were recruited, representing three cultural groups (White, Indian, and Chinese). Descriptive data were used to describe the sample and identify specific self-care behaviours performed in the home environment. FINDINGS: Results indicate statistically significant differences between white and non-white individuals related to use of incentive spirometer (p = 0.04), deep breathing and coughing exercises (p = 0.04), and activity modification (p < 0.05) at 1 week following hospital discharge.
IMPLICATIONS: Future research and theoretical exploration are required to assist in the understanding of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the differences that are noted between white and non-white groups.

History

Language

eng