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How African Nova Scotians envision culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogy as civic repair

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journal contribution
posted on 13.01.2022, 16:14 by Johanne Jean-PierreJohanne Jean-Pierre

This article presents findings that connect cultural trauma, culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogy and Black Canadians ' aspirations. African Nova Scotians constitute the largest multigenerational Black Canadian community, with 400years of presence in Atlantic Canada. Despite the end of de jure school segregation in 1954, African Nova Scotians’ social and cultural capital were not incorporated in curricular and pedagogical practices. Using the theoretical framework of cultural trauma, this article draws from a qualitative study conducted using semi-structured interviews and focus groups with sixty participants. A cultural trauma process takes place after a traumatic event and involves a cycle of meaning-making and interpretation that can result in demands for reparation or civic repair. This study illustrates how through the cultural trauma process grounded in their collective memory, African Nova Scotians articulate an aspiration for culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogy as a form of civic repair. This transformative pedagogy would facilitate a reconnection with their heritage and a fulfilment of the democratic goals of public education.

Funding

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

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Ryerson University Faculty of Community Services Seed Grant

Ryerson University Faculty of Community Services Publication Grant

History

Editor

Taylor & Francis

Language

English