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A single-phase DC-AC dual-active-bridge based resonant converter for grid-connected photovoltaic applications

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thesis
posted on 24.05.2021, 14:49 by Marcos Felix Aguirre
In the wake of the global energy crisis, the integration of renewable energy resources, energy storage devices, and electric vehicles into the electric grid has been of great interest towards replacing conventional, fossil-fuel-dependent energy resources. This thesis presents the circuit topology and a control strategy for a 250-W single-phase gridconnected dc-ac converter for photovoltaic (PV) solar applications. The converter is based on the dual active bridge (DAB) kernel employing a series-resonant link and a high-frequency isolation stage. For interfacing the 60-Hz ac grid with the 78-kHz resonant circuit, the converter utilizes a four-quadrant switch array that functions as an ac-ac stage. Therefore, a bipolar low-frequency voltage source, that is the grid voltage, is used to synthesize a symmetrical high-frequency voltage pulse-train for the resonant circuit. Thus, soft switching and the use of a compact ferrite-core transformer have been possible. Then, a fast current-control loop ensures that the converter injects a sinusoidal current in phase with the grid voltage, while a relatively slower feedback loop regulates the converter dc-side voltage, that is, the PV array voltage, at a desired value. To simulate the converter and to design the controllers, the thesis also presents nonlinear large-signal and linearized small-signal state-space averaged models. The performance of the converter is assessed through simulation studies conducted using the aforementioned averaged models, a detailed topological model in the PLECS software environment, and a prototype. Keywords: Photovoltaic, PV, Microinverter, Dual Active Bridge, Phase-shift Modulation, High Frequency Transformer

History

Language

eng

Degree

Master of Applied Science

Program

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Granting Institution

Ryerson University

LAC Thesis Type

Thesis