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Canadian ethnic media and social capital development : Examining the relationship between broadcasting policy, multicultural programming and sociocultural integration and cohesion in Canada

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thesis
posted on 24.05.2021, 14:42 by Erika M. Hogerwaard
Using Canada as a case for analysis, this research investigates the potential for ethnic media, which are mandated to deliver content directed to "racially and culturally distinct" (CRTC, 1999) groups that are not English, French or Aboriginal, to act as an integrative tool for allophone communities, and to stimulate intercultural exchanges amongst all Canadians that can lead to the development of social capital. Given Canada's extraordinary demographic heterogeneity, the mechanisms in place to encourage the development of networks between and among ethnic communities are increasingly important for supporting social solidarity in the broader population (Putnam, 2006). Canada's Broadcasting Act, §3(1)(d)(iii) (1991) and related policies which the Act initiates, including the Ethnic Broadcasting Policy, provide a policy framework for the creation and distribution of culturally and linguistically diverse content" to Canadian audiences, demonstrating official support for the potential social benefits associated with the national availability of ethnic media. By developing culturally and linguistically diverse content aligned with the demographic realities of the Canadian population within a supportive policy environment, ethnic media can provide, an important platform for sharing information and ideas across vast geographic or sociocultural divides, as well as a venue for fostering community building, civic involvement and an active dialogue amongst Canadians of all backgrounds. This research seeks to explore and develop theoretical linkages between the existing policy framework governing ethnic broadcasting in Canada, the broadcasting sector's methods of compliance with existing regulation, and the development of social capital.

History

Degree

Master of Arts

Program

Communication and Culture

Granting Institution

Charles Davis Ryerson University

LAC Thesis Type

Thesis