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Disabled children write their own book: ensuring disabled children’s rights, well-being, and interests in their services

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posted on 23.05.2021, 13:25 by Jaclyn Ederman
While the importance of disabled children’s rights, well-being, and interests are frequently discussed internationally, how they are incorporated in services is rarely mentioned. This study explores traditional and non-traditional approaches by interviewing two community-based service-providers to illuminate which approach comes closer to ensuring disabled children’s rights, well-being, and interests. Thematic analysis produced findings that acknowledged the extent to which the services differ including: service provided, program plans, benefits, and approach to challenges with children. The traditional approach positions disabled children as silent actors by taking control and by its formal structure. The non-traditional approach acknowledges disabled children as social actors by incorporating ways for children to exercise control of their own lives and by its informality, which promotes disabled children’s individuality. These factors suggest the non-traditional approach comes closer to ensuring disabled children’s rights, well-being, and interests. Implications are significant for reconsidering practice and policies in the hope that disabled children’s rights in services are ensured for future generations.

History

Language

eng

Degree

Master of Arts

Program

Early Childhood Studies

Granting Institution

Ryerson University

LAC Thesis Type

Thesis

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Early Childhood Studies (Theses)

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