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Effects of regular self-weighing on weight management: restrained and unrestrained eaters in first-year university.

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posted on 22.05.2021, 12:26 authored by Rachel Strimas
Obesity poses a global health concern. Prevention has emphasized the utility of weight monitoring, but its effect on restrained eaters is unstudied. This study examined the interactive effects of self-weighing and restrained eating on the body mass index of first-year university students over a three-month period. Participants (N = 100) were randomized into one of three groups: Group 1 (n = 36) weighed themselves daily; Group 2 (n = 31) weighed themselves weekly; and Group 3 (n = 33) measured their heart rate weekly. Results revealed that weekly weighing assisted in weight control among restrained eaters, while daily weighing led to significant weight gain (p = 0.003). There was modest support for the utility of regular weighing to assist in the prevention of weight gain among unrestrained eaters. Overall findings suggest that interventions designed to aid in weight control should be implemented judiciously. Further consideration of individual differences may ultimately help to tailor clinical and public health recommendations aimed at weight management.

History

Degree

Master of Arts

Program

Psychology

Granting Institution

Ryerson University

LAC Thesis Type

Thesis

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