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Parametric Solar Architecture

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thesis
posted on 24.05.2021, 12:36 by Victor P. Kuslikis
Integrating photovoltaic systems into the urban landscape is fundamental to the wide scale acceptance of the technology. It is also one of the major factors currently limiting its popularity, coupled with high costs, and the lack of adequate storage methods. Contributing to the lack of architectural integration are shortcomings in design tools and an overall lack of forward thinking proposals suggesting how society can begin implementing solar power on a large scale. Research conducted by the International Energy Agency 'Task 41: Solar Energy and Architecture' has identified the need for more developed toolsets to help designers quantify solar exposure and shading coefficients during the conceptual design phase. Although software to calculate incident surface radiation is available, it is largely detached from the traditional design process and workflow. What is required to improve the architectural integration of photovoltaic systems is a new design methodology. A method that must be both inherently flexible and quantifiable, so that designers can validate and modify designs quickly and efficiently. In a process where innovative digital tools combined with the intuition of the designer expand the creative possibilities of intelligent solar architecture. The aim of the project is to develop a new design methodology by combining parametric and environmental analysis tools, providing quantitative performance indicators in order to assist architects at the early design stage. Using case studies, the project will demonstrate how this methodology is applicable to a wide array of project typologies within an urban context. In addition to demonstrating the applicability of the system, the case studies would also illustrate the potential for photvoltaic installations to alter the landscape of the city and facilitate a fresh dialogue between public space and renewable energy generation.

History

Language

eng

Degree

Master of Architecture

Program

Architecture

Granting Institution

Ryerson University

LAC Thesis Type

Thesis

Thesis Advisor

Miljana Horvat